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Post Storm Tree Assessment

Updated: Apr 24, 2023







One thing many people don’t think about is having a hazard tree assessment conducted after a storm comes through. Often, trees stand for months after a major storm comes through, only to fail in the summer or fall later that year. This is because there may be structural defects present that are difficult to identify with an untrained eye.

After a storm has passed, it is essential to conduct tree risk assessments to ensure the safety of people and property. A tree risk assessment is the process of evaluating the potential risks associated with a tree, including the likelihood of failure, the consequences of failure, and the potential targets that could be affected.


There are several reasons why tree risk assessments are crucial after a storm:


A. Storms can cause severe damage to trees, including broken branches, uprooted trees, and split trunks. These damages weaken the tree's structure, making them more susceptible to failure. Conducting a tree risk assessment after a storm can help identify any damage caused by the storm, allowing property owners to take appropriate action to mitigate the risk of tree failure.


B. After a storm, trees that have been damaged or weakened can pose a danger to people and property. For example, broken branches can fall onto power lines or vehicles, while uprooted trees can fall onto houses or other structures. By conducting a tree risk assessment after a storm, property owners can identify any trees that pose a danger and take steps to reduce the risk of failure, such as pruning or removing the tree.


C. Property owners have a duty of care to ensure that their trees are safe and do not pose a risk to others. If a tree on your property falls and causes damage or injury to someone else, you could be liable for any damages or injuries caused. By conducting a tree risk assessment after a storm, you can identify any trees that pose a risk and take action to mitigate that risk, reducing your liability.


D. Conducting a tree risk assessment after a storm is a proactive approach to tree management. Rather than waiting for a tree to fail, conducting a risk assessment allows property owners to identify any potential risks and take appropriate action to mitigate those risks. This approach can help prevent damage or injury and save property owners time and money in the long run.


E. Professional arborists are trained to conduct tree risk assessments and can identify any potential risks associated with trees on your property. They can assess the condition of the tree, identify any structural weaknesses, and recommend appropriate action to mitigate any risks. By hiring a professional arborist to conduct a tree risk assessment after a storm, property owners can ensure that their trees are safe and that any potential risks are identified and addressed.



Nothing beats having a trained professional assess your tree; however, as a homeowner, you should be looking regularly to see if anything has changed in your trees. Here are some common defects everyone should look for after a storm:


1. Hangers (broken branches hanging in the tree)

2. Horizontal Cracks

3. Vertical Cracks

4. Standing water at the dripline

5. Uplifting Roots

6. Change in Lean

All photos are from www.canva.com


In conclusion, conducting a tree risk assessment after a storm is essential to ensure the safety of people and property. Trees that have been damaged or weakened by a storm can pose a danger and a liability to property owners. By identifying any potential risks associated with trees on your property and taking appropriate action to mitigate those risks, you can prevent damage or injury and save time and money in the long run. Hiring a professional arborist to conduct a tree risk assessment is the best way to ensure that your trees are safe and that any potential risks are identified and addressed.



** TREE WORK IS INHERENTLY DANGEROUS AND SHOULD ONLY BE DONE BY LICENSED AND INSURED ISA CERTIFIED ARBORISTS WITH ADEQUATE SAFETY PRECAUTIONS IN PLACE**



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